The Bay of Plenty; a summary of the physical landscape, economy, demographics and issues surrounding primary production

Authors

  • Simon Stokes

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33584/jnzg.2013.75.2911

Abstract

The "Bay of Plenty" was a term coined by Captain Cook when his ship Endeavour rounded East Cape on 29 October 1769 and came upon local populations large and prosperous. It has a uniquely youthful volcanic landscape, interspersed with twelve iconic lakes, and several harbours and estuaries, the eastern boundary being framed by the main axial range of the North Island. With approximately 71% of the land area afforested or in indigenous habitat, there is not a huge amount of land left for agricultural and horticultural production; this has to compete with changing community demands, urbanisation and infrastructural growth, and a rapidly expanding population. This raises expectations on the primary sectors to manage their businesses in a way which reduces the effects of those sectors on the surrounding environment. With pumice soils dominating, and water quality an issue, the security and future of the region's primary producers is both necessary and problematic.

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Published

2013-01-01

Issue

Section

Articles